The Royalton and Woodstock Turnpike

Above stone marker located at One The Green

Above stone marker located at One The Green

"As stated the Royalton and Woodstock Turnpike Company was incorporated November 7, 1800, to build 'from Royalton meetinghouse to Woodstock court-house,' and its road was built in spite of the effort of the promoters of the Center to improve their franchise, granted three days earlier.
Again we are indebted to Lovejoy, who tells us that the turnpike promotion was opposed by the inhabitants of the towns of Pomfret and Woodstock, and that to placate them much latitude was used in defining their domestic concerns, in the prosecution of which they were allowed to pass free over the road. This conciliation was continued until 1838, when David Bosworth, a local 'man of the hour,' was appointed toll gatherer and promptly drew the lines tighter. A merry war resulted, but it appears that the company, being within its legal rights, prevailed.
At the northerly end of the turnpike the company maintained a bridge over the White River, which, after twenty-five years of service, became unsafe. Owing to insufficient revenue the company felt unable to repair the bridge and sought to abandon it, seeking a new location by which it could use a bridge owned by the town. The usual opposition was encountered and as usual a compromise was made. The town of Royalton voted in 1830 that, if the company would properly maintain its road, the town would contribute twenty-five dollars annually toward the repairs of the bridge.
May 1, 1842, the road became free by action of the court under authority of the act of 1839." 


Exerpt from The Turnpikes of New England by Frederic J. Wood

Stone Turnpike Marker. 1802. At the junction of Central and Elm Street. Marker shown in the historic photo on the left.

Stone Turnpike Marker. 1802. At the junction of Central and Elm Street. Marker shown in the historic photo on the left.